Water and Environment

Water and Sanitation for All is a unit of three lessons designed to:
1) Raise awareness of the problems facing children with inadequate access to clean water or sanitation facilities
2) Increase students' understanding of the issue as one that affects them as well
3) Explore how organizations, agencies and individuals are working to address the problems
4) Encourage students to take their own steps in addressing the local and global issues of water and sanitation

Kids you are helping by Trick-or-Treating for UNICEF—Rosie Bell in Nicaragua

Almost 800 million people around the world don't have access to clean, safe water including one third of the people living in Nicaragua's country side. Until recently 12 year old, Rosie Bell used to get up at the crack of dawn and walk a mile and a half to fetch water for her family from a creek. Despite all this effort the water was unclean and dirty. Consuming the unclean water caused a nearly fatal case of cholera for Rosie's younger brother.

UNICEF has installed a solar powered water pump and filtration system for a new well in this Nicaraguan community. The new well provides pure clean water that is pumped directly into households. Rosie Bell and other kids are now safe from contracting fatal water borne diseases. Rosie Bell no longer has to take the daily long walk and can attend school.

What Does Achieving the Water MDG Mean for School Children?

UNICEF and the World Health Organization recently announced that the world had met the Millennium Development Goal target of halving the proportion of people without access to safe drinking water, well ahead of the 2015 deadline.

 

In the lead-up to World Water Day on March 22, UNICEF podcast moderator Femi Oke spoke with Murat Sahin, UNICEF advisor on the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene in Schools initiative, and Alexander Schratz, the Executive Director of Fit for School, a Philippines-based non-governmental organization, about how much progress has been made and what this means for children.

For more information, see http://www.educationandtransition.org/resources/what-does-achieving-the-water-mdg-mean-for-school-children/.

In the Face of Worst Outbreak in Decades, Children in Cameroon Learn to Fight Cholera

Educating school children and young people about cholera and other waterborne diseases is at the heart of a new campaign, ‘My School Without Cholera’, launched by the government across Cameroon’s three northern regions and supported by UNICEF and other partners, including the private sector. At the recording of this podcast in 2010, the country was facing the worst cholera outbreak in over 20 years. With more than 7,000 cases and some 500 deaths, the need to promote essential hygiene and sanitation practices with clear information is urgent.  (http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/cameroon_56562.html)

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