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45 Years in the Making

Nicolas Mignanwande was a little boy attending a UNICEF school in his small village of Ganvie, in Benin, when Denis Hargrave arrived in the village to shoot a documentary. The film focused on the challenges of growing up in Ganvie, and the hope and opportunity that the UNICEF school provided.

In this video, watched what Denis learned about young Nicolas about forty five years later, through a series of remarkable coincidences...

Nicolas graduated from that same UNICEF school and went on to become a teacher and then Supervisor of Education for his district. Nicolas' older brother, Hubert, also a graduate from the UNICEF school, received his PhD in Psychology from the Sorbonne. Today Nicolas' youngest boy, Ponce, is in medical school and studying to become a doctor.

Bilingual Education in Guatemala

Since the 16th century when Spain colonized Guatemala, Spanish was imposed as the official language and became the sole language taught in schools. Through UNICEF's teacher program, Guatemalan students begin school in their native tongue and are gradually introduced to Spanish. By the end of primary school, students are fluent in Spanish and ready for the outside world. 

UNICEF is committed to bilingual education because we believe that every child has the right to education in their native tongue. In this video, you follow a young girl, Monica, who is currently learning in both Spanish and Cakchiquel in school. "Every child needs an opportunity to develop their potential, otherwise we might lose them forever," -- Teresa Chumil, Elementary School Teacher.

UNICEF is committed to bilingual education because we believe that every child has the right to education in their native tongue. In this video, you follow a young girl, Monica, who is currently learning in both Spanish and Cakchiquel in school. "Every child needs an opportunity to develop their potential, otherwise we might lose them forever," -- Teresa Chumil, Elementary School Teacher.

Sahel Food Crisis - UNICEF-Supported Treatment Centers

UNICEF and its partners are working together to save the lives of children across the world. In this video, see how UNICEF-supported treatment centers help children suffering from malnutrition in Mauritania. The country is in the Sahel region, one that suffers from chronic drought-conditions, leaving livestock and crops without the water they need. This creates a food shortage causing tens of thousands of children to be chronically malnourished. UNICEF-supported treatment centers provide fortified food to give children the nutrients they need to survive. In order to provide these services, UNICEF needs financial support.

Combating Polio in India

Although the number of polio cases has dropped to 1,500 cases a year from 350,000 in 1988, polio still poses a threat to the health of many, especially those living in India. UNICEF USA works to educate families on protecting themselves from the polio virus. UNICEF has also provided 1 billion doses of vaccines a year to clinics and hospitals in India; but polio cannot be eliminated until every person has been vaccinated. In the video, hear the stories of how UNICEF aid has changes the lives of people affected by polio.

Combatting HIV/AIDS in Malawi

More than 34 million people are living with HIV/AIDS and more than 3 million of those are children. Most cases of infection are in sub-Saharan Africa. In this video, see the story of two boys who receive help from UNICEF-assisted hospitals and received the antiretroviral therapy they needed to survive. UNICEF provides antiretroviral treatment as well as supplies and equipment to help treat HIV/AIDS, but needs funding to continue providing relief.

Combating Malaria in Ghana

Over 200 Million people contract malaria every year, and of those more than 600,000 cases end in death. In Ghana alone, more than 200,000 children die. Malaria is a treatable and preventable disease. UNICEF USA has provided more than 2 million treated bed nets to families with young children to help reduce the infection rate. In this video, hear the stories of two young mothers each of whom lost a child to malaria and are now hopeful for the future thanks to UNICEF and the bed nets they provide.

Nirmala: Child Head of Household in Nepal

There are 650,000 orphaned children living in Nepal. It is UNICEF's goal to ensure orphaned children around the world receive the support they need to live a healthy life. In this video, see the story of Nirmala, a young orphaned girl left to care for her younger siblings. With the help of UNICEF she is receiving support to keep her family healthy. UNICEF needs help to support these children through generous donations of all sizes, please visit UNICEF USA at http://www.unicefusa.org/ to donate today.

Street Children in Rwanda

Video Analysis Activity: Street Children in Rwanda

Video Background

Tens of millions of children are living on the streets of urban areas around the world. Street children face barriers to basic rights such as education and are vulnerable to violence and exploitation. This video tells the story of Egide, a thirteen year old boy from the East African country of Rwanda, who began living on the streets of the capital city, Kigali, to escape a chaotic home situation. Egide eventually leaves the streets thanks to the work of Fidesco, a UNICEF-supported center for street children in Kigali. The exact number of street children in Rwanda is unknown, but estimates show this number to be in the thousands. The root causes of this problem include poverty, HIV/AIDS, domestic violence, and displacement caused by the country's 1990-1994 war and 1994 genocide. As part of its child protection strategy, UNICEF is working to increase support to centers in Rwanda like Fedesco to ensure that children living on the streets are safely reintegrated into their family homes.

For more information on this topic visit: http://www.unicef.org/protection/rwanda_61774.html

Discussion Questions:

1.       What factors in Egide’s home life led him to begin living on the streets of Kigali? What was life like for Egide as a street child?

2.       How does Fidesco, the UNICEF-supported center, help children like Egide and his friends? 

3.       What two occupations does Egide aspire to for his future? Through these professions, how can Egide help confront the problem of children living on the streets in Rwanda? What are your aspirations for the future and how might your future career impact the lives of children living in the United States and around the world?

4.       Extension Activity: Children living on the streets face barriers to basic rights such as education and healthcare. To learn more about the rights of children, complete TeachUNICEF’s Activity Sheet: Convention on the Rights of the Child

 

Additional Teaching and Learning Resources:

U.S. Fund for UNICEF Story: When kids end up on the street

TeachUNICEF Resources on Child Rights

Rwandan Government Study on the Situation of Street Children in Rwanda (especially the Executive Summary, p. 9-10)

Information for Teachers on Street Children

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